Split-Screen Android Apps Coming to Chrome OS

Last Edited: September 2, 2018 | Published: February 25, 2018 by

If there is one thing that Chrome OS needs in order to become a serious contender in the laptop market, it’s a strong app ecosystem. Google has already made a tremendous effort in accomplishing this just by bringing Android apps to Chrome OS. And now, it seems, Google is upping the game as they improve the interface of Android apps by adding split-screen Android apps in Chrome OS.

This feature is not only important for laptop functionality, but tablet functionality as well. The rumor is that more Chrome OS tablets as well as laptops and 2-in-1 devices will be coming to the market in the not so distant future, so this new feature will be a welcome addition.

To see how it works, you can check out this video from Chrome Unboxed below:

It’s important to note that in the video, the Samsung Chromebook Pro was running Chrome OS Canary, which is a very early pre-release version. That means that the inclusion of this feature is probably still several months away. Still, many believe that this feature is likely to be fast tracked and put in place as soon as possible in order to get ready for the influx of the new devices that are expected to be released over the next year or two.

As far as how it functions, it works much like Windows 10 and even Android. When you enter the multitask view, you will get a list of the running apps. Once you select one of the apps, you can then drag it to one side of the screen or the other and it will snap in place. Once you pick another app, it will automatically snap into the free space allowing you to view both apps at the same time. Once you have both apps open, you can then resize them. So, if you want an app to take up two-thirds of the screen with the other app using the remaining space, all you have to do is drag it over and the windows will automatically resize for you.

This functionality has already been available for Chrome OS, but thus far only works for Chrome apps and not Android apps downloaded from the Play Store. This addition will be a welcome one as it will increase the functionality of the Android apps, and that’s something that is sorely needed as integration between the two operating systems continues.

Chromebooks have come a long way in the last year, and Google continues to push the operating system in an attempt to make it a serious competitor in the market of both tablets and laptops. How far it will go still remains to be seen. I, for one, and really liking what they are doing, and may even consider getting my own Chromebook in the near future. If a Chromebook sounds right for you, I suggest checking out our Best Chromebook Buying Guide to find the perfect Chromebook for you.

Do you use a Chromebook? If so, what do you think about it? Do you like this latest update? Tell me your thoughts in the comments below.

About the author

Matt Garrett

Matt is an IT professional with over fifteen years experience supporting network infrastructure and computers. An avid gamer, Matt enjoys his time playing and writing about his experiences both in the IT world and in the gaming communities. You can find more of his writing for LaptopNinja where he enjoys talking about everything tech.


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